Tag Archives: Windows Server

Tonight on the PowerScripting Podcast: Rick Claus and Symon Perriman talk about Build a Windows Server and System Center Environment with the PowerShell Deployment Toolkit


Join us tonight at 9:30 PM as Rick Claus and Symon Perriman talk about how to Build a Windows Server and System Center Environment with the PowerShell Deployment Toolkit.

 

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Script for Setting Up and Demoing a DSC Pull Server


DSC Setup and Demo Scripts

I recently set up a virtual machine to use for Desired State Configuration (DSC) demos. I wanted to make the demo-ing fairly brainless, as DSC requires a number of setup steps to get a pull server running. So I took some demo scripts Microsoft offered from TechEd 2013, updated them to work with Windows Server 2012 R2 RTM, and thought I’d offer them to you.

SetupDSC.ps1 is the main script. Now, because I didn’t want to use good ol’ Start-Demo, there’s a who crapload of kinda ugly Write-Debug statements. That way I can get an “about to do ____” message and then have the script pause before doing it. Lets me explain to the class what’s about to happen. You can remove all that crud if you like.

InstallPullServerConfig.ps1 and PSWSIISEndpoint.psm1 are the updated Microsoft scripts. SetupDSC.ps1 calls these. They’re intended to run locally; you’ll need to be on the machine you want to make into a pull server, and it needs to be Windows Server 2012 R2 (the DSC pull server role is part of the OS, not part of Windows Management Framework v4). Setup takes a few minutes, and will install IIS. This sets up an HTTP pull server.

SampleConfig.ps1 is a sample DSC configuration, targeted to a computer named MEMBER2. It just specifies that the Windows Server Backup feature be installed. SetupDSC.ps1 actually runs this, which produces a MOF. SetupDSC.ps1 also copies the MOF to the DSC pull server configuration directory.

SampleSetPullMode.ps1 also gets run by SetupDSC.ps1. This contains a DSC Local Configuration Manager configuration, targeted to MEMBER2, that turns on pull mode and directs MEMBER2 to pull the previously-created configuration. I think I have it refreshing every 5 minutes, which is totally unrealistic for production. Again, this was made for class demos, but you can adjust the time or leave it off to default to 30min. Running this script creates the MOF and pushes it to MEMBER2. That, in turn, causes MEMBER2 to start pulling the sample config, which causes Windows Server Backup to be installed.

SetupDSC.ps1 has some additional code to show that Windows Server Backup isn’t installed, and then is installed (after you give the pull time to occur).

Anyway, might need some tweaking to use in production, but hopefully it’ll give you a snapshot of the whole DSC process. Much thanks to James Dawson’s article on DSC, which gave me a couple of the tweaks I needed to get all this working on RTM code.

Enjoy.

Notes for Event 6


When I read the instructions for event 6, I thought that here’s a tough one. A lot of competitors won’t have access to a test environment with Windows Server 2012 and Virtual Machines that they can actually work with. So, I expected that many of the entries wouldn’t get tested and intended to forgive minor errors that would have shown up in testing.

Well, there was one thing that really surprised me. The instructions were quite clear about minimizing “Are You Sure” queries to the user, but you can count on one hand the number of entries that included -Confirm:$false. This is just an example of why it’s so important to read the problem statement very carefully and extract the solution requirements. Then, after creating the solution, go back and verify that the requirements have all been met. Many of the entries called out this requirement in the comments, but then didn’t account for it in the script.

I had mentioned in a previous blog entry that, particularly in the advanced entries, the author was working too hard. Sometimes this means putting more emphasis on “completeness” than in solving the problem. Here’s an example of a wasted effort. A few entries used the [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()] test for a possible alternate to the default value for “Server”.  Because there is a default value for the parameter, it won’t be null or empty making this test unnecessary. Here, give this a try:

function Test-NullOrEmpty { [CmdletBinding()] Param ( [ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()] $Name = "Server" ) "Got $Name" } Test-NullOrEmpty

Note that calling the function without a named parameter just assigns the default value. In order to make it fail you have to deliberately call the function with an empty value (Test-NullOrEmpty -Name), which is not going to happen in the real world.

I know that these are just nit-picking – and if these are examples of the nits in the Event 6 entries, then CONGRATULATIONS!! y’all did a mighty fine job of solving the problem. Calling out these issues is just intended as a learning opportunity. There are lots and lots of correct ways to write PowerShell solutions, it’s just that some are more efficient or take less typing than others. And learning about them is one of the important results of participating in the games.

Thanks to all of you for your efforts!

Microsoft announces PowerShell v4, DSC


Yesterday at TechEd North America, Jeffrey Snover and Kenneth Hansen began describing features to be delivered with PowerShell v4 in Windows Server 2012 R2 (the company has not yet announced availability dates for either).

In particular, a new feature called Desired State Configuration promises to become the foundation for some pretty serious expansion. Essentially, DSC lets administrators write a declarative “script” that describes what a computer should look like. PowerShell takes that, matches the declarative components with underlying modules, and ensures that the computer does, in fact, look like that. Nearly anything can be checked and controlled: roles, features, files, registry keys – anything, in fact, that a PowerShell module can do.

The architecture includes the notion of centrally stored declarative scripts, and the ability to dynamically deploy supporting modules on an as-needed basis to computers that are checking themselves. A System Center Virtual Machine Manager demonstration utilized the feature to dynamically spin up brand-new VM instances and have them immediately reconfigure to their desired state.

At first glance, it’s easy to see “more Microsoft stuff” in this feature. After all, the company has previous given us Dynamic Systems Management (DSM), various universal “configuration languages,” and even System Center Configuration Manager’s somewhat primitive configuration auditing feature. But keep in mind that DSC will be a core part of the OS. That means product teams and ISVs can rely on it being there, with no other dependencies to worry about. DSC is also built around DMTF standards – like the MOF format – making it natively suitable for cross-platform management. A demo from Opscode using their Chef product showed clever use of the new DSC feature.

Hansen also mentioned that PowerShell modules will be deployable through DSC as ZIP files, helping make them more self-contained (not entirely unlike PECL packages in the Unix world).

There has been no announcement as yet on how far back PowerShell v4 will be made available, nor whether or not DSC is a PowerShell feature or a Windows Server 2012 R2 feature. If it is indeed a PowerShell feature (which I suspect it is), then it’ll be available on any system with v4 installed. That will hopefully include at least Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and later.

Use the AD DS Module to Find Computers with PowerShell


Summary: The Scripting Wife learns about querying Active Directory Domain Services with Windows PowerShell in prep for the 2013 Scripting Games.

Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Well yesterday I gave my first presentation (of three) at the PowerShell Summit happening here in Redmond, Washington. I thought my talk went really well, and several tweets I saw seemed to confirm that. I was also able to see some excellent presentations during the say. The Scripting Wife ran the registration desk, and so she was able to see everyone who is out here this week.

I am still on Charlotte time, and therefore am waking up at oh dark thirty each day. Surprisingly, the Scripting Wife has also been making early morning appearances for breakfast as well. Anyway, I am in the lobby sipping a cup of English Breakfast Tea (I did not bring any lemon grass or cinnamon sticks with me) and so it not my favorite cup of tea ever – but it is ok. It is strong, and helps to breakdown the croissants.

My eyes are closed as I visualize my two presentations I am making today at the PowerShell Summit. I open my eyes, and there she is – the Scripting Wife.

“If you are that sleepy, you need to go back upstairs and get some rest,” she began.

“Not sleepy, I am thinking about my presentations today,” I said.

“Oh that. Then you are not really doing anything, and so you can help me,” she said.

“What do you need,” I asked.

“I need to know how to query Active Directory,” she said.

“Say what,” I shockingly exclaimed. “Why do you need to query AD?”

“Well I think it is going to be in the 2013 Scripting Games, and so I figure I need to know how to query AD,” she said with emphasis.

“Well all right,” I said.

Use the ActiveDirectory module to query AD

“First let me fire up a Windows Server 2012 domain controller on my Windows 8 Hyper-V,” I said.

“I will take your word for it,” she said will as little interest as possible. “Just let me know when you are ready.”

I logged onto the Windows Server 2012 domain controller, and opened the Windows PowerShell console.

“Ok. It is up,” I said.

“So what do I need to do,” she asked.

“Well to get a listing of all computers in AD use the Get-ADComputer cmdlet. Specify a wildcard for the filter,” I instructed.

The Scripting Wife slid the laptop over to her, and typed the following:

Get-ADCo<tab><space>-f<tab><space>*<enter>

When she typed –f<tab> there was a slight pause, and the Windows PowerShell progress bar appeared as it imported the ActiveDirectory module. After that, the command proceeded quickly. The command appears here:

Get-ADComputer -Filter *

A command and the first computer from the output appears here:

PS C:\> Get-ADComputer -Filter *

DistinguishedName : CN=DC1,OU=Domain Controllers,DC=nwtraders,DC=msft

DNSHostName : dc1.nwtraders.msft

Enabled : True

Name : DC1

ObjectClass : computer

ObjectGUID : e1b57333-7155-4026-949d-82c35400a850

SamAccountName : DC1$

SID : S-1-5-21-1844339390-1396565537-2470583527-1001

UserPrincipalName :

Requesting a specific attribute

“Well that was painless. But what if I need to know the version of the operating system. How do I get that information? It does not seem to be in the output,” she asked.

“Well that is a very good observation. There are many more properties for each object in Active Directory Domain Services than are returned by a basic query. The reason for returning a subset of the attributes is for performance reasons. To request a specific property such as operatingsystem add the properties parameter. Why don’t you go ahead and try that,” I suggested.

The Scripting Wife thought for about 30 seconds and then she used the up arrow to retrieve her previous command. Next she added the –properties parameter and she added the operatingsystem attribute. This is what she typed:

<up arrow><space>-p<tab><space>operatingsystem<enter>

The command she created appears here.

Get-ADComputer -Filter * -Properties operatingsystem

The command and first output appears here.

PS C:\> Get-ADComputer -Filter * -Properties operatingsystem

DistinguishedName : CN=DC1,OU=Domain Controllers,DC=nwtraders,DC=msft

DNSHostName : dc1.nwtraders.msft

Enabled : True

Name : DC1

ObjectClass : computer

ObjectGUID : e1b57333-7155-4026-949d-82c35400a850

OperatingSystem : Windows Server 2012 Standard

SamAccountName : DC1$

SID : S-1-5-21-1844339390-1396565537-2470583527-1001

UserPrincipalName :

Using wildcards for properties

“That is pretty cool, but I do not like the output – it is rather crowded. I only want the name of the server and the name of the operating system. Can I get that,” she asked.

“But of course you can,” I said in my best Bela Lugosi imitation.

Ignoring the humorous voice, she plowed on, “So are you going to help me?”

“Well you cannot use a wildcard in the properties parameter, but when you use the Sort-Object cmdlet and the select-Object cmdlet you can use wildcards. So retrieve your previous command and pipeline it to Sort-Object and to Select-Object,” I said.

She thought for a minute, and this is what she typed:

<up arrow><space>|<space>sort<space>oper*<space>|<space>select<space>name,oper*<enter>

The command she created appears here:

Get-ADComputer -Filter * -Properties operatingsystem | sort oper* | select name, oper*

The command and the output appears here:

PS C:\> Get-ADComputer -Filter * -Properties operatingsystem | sort oper* | select name, oper*

name OperatingSystem

—- —————

C7 Windows 7 Ultimate

C1 Windows 8 Enterprise

C2 Windows 8 Enterprise

SQL1 Windows Server 2012 Datacenter

DC1 Windows Server 2012 Standard

“That is pretty cool. Thanks. I am outta here, I think I just saw some PowerShell Summit people come in,” she said. And with that she was gone. I figured I would see her again when I got to building 40.

Join us tomorrow as the Scripting Wife continues studying for the 2013 Scripting Games.

I invite you to follow me on Twitter and Facebook. If you have any questions, send email to me at [email protected], or post your questions on the Official Scripting Guys Forum. See you tomorrow. Until then, peace.

Ed Wilson, Microsoft Scripting Guy

Windows Server Backup


Windows Server 2012 has a PowerShell enabled backup utility. When you enable the feature you get a module called WindowsServerBackup.  It has the cmldets you would expect for creating and managing backups. No surprise you may say as this was avialable in Windows 2008 R2.

The difference with Windows Server 2012 is that you can do restores from PowerShell cmdlets whcih wasn’t available in the earlier version.

The restore cmdlets are

Start-WBFileRecovery

Start-WBHyperVRecovery

Start-WBSystemStateRecovery

Start-WBVolumeRecovery

 

This might not replace your currebt backup system but is very useful for backing up test environments and experimenting with things like authorative AD restores.

TechDays San Francisco


talkbubble-v3I’m very excited to announce that I’ll be presenting at TechDays San Francisco this year. The event runs May 2nd and 3rd. You can find the schedule here. Registration will be forthcoming. Seating will be limited so you won’t want to delay once it opens up.

As you might expect I’ll be talking PowerShell, plus a few other topics I hope you’ll find interesting. Everything is subject to last minute change but here are my current plans.

10 PowerShell Mistakes, Trips and Traps and How to Avoid Them

Windows PowerShell is a language and management technology that many IT professionals, including developers, think they understand. Yet very often they get caught up in pre-conceptions and misinterpretations, usually based on prior experience with scripting or development. This session will explore the 10 most common mistakes and traps that people fall into with PowerShell and how to avoid them.

File and Folder Provisioning with PowerShell and Windows Server 2012

If you manage file servers and aren’t using PowerShell, you are working much too hard. Or if you are using PowerShell v2 you are still working pretty hard. Fortunately PowerShell v3 along with Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 offer a much better solution. This session will demonstrate how to provision and manage folders, files and file shares using PowerShell from a Windows 8 client. With a little up-front work, you ‘ll be able to create provisioning scripts to deploy a new file share in seconds.

Troubleshooting Active Directory with Windows PowerShell

Active Directory is one of those technologies that when it works, nobody notices. But when it doesn’t work, everyone does. Fortunately, Windows PowerShell and Windows Server 2012 make a terrific troubleshooting tool. In this session we’ll look at some common Active Directory problems, how to diagnose them and in some cases resolve, all with Windows PowerShell.

Building a Windows 8 Hyper-V Lab

We all know the benefits of testing in a non-production environment. But sometimes resources are limited and having a test setup seems like a lot of work. But now that Windows 8 includes Hyper-V, you can setup a lab environment in very little time. This session will guide you through setting up a Hyper-V based test lab and how to get the most out of it using the PowerShell management tools.

As I get more details I’ll share them here, on Twitter and on Google Plus.

Updatable Help speaks only English! What’s up with that?


Our customers have certainly not been shy about their interest in multiple languages of Windows PowerShell Updatable Help, and we’re grateful to hear how much they would value localized Help. Our challenge is this: Updatable Help is a new feature for this release of Windows PowerShell, and we have so very many new cmdlets and modules for Windows PowerShell 3.0 (over 2,300 new cmdlets in 95 modules). It takes time to translate the content once it’s available in English, and we can’t translate all of it. There’s just too much new content. One of the Windows PowerShell Core modules just by itself contains over 87,000 words, meaning it’s roughly the same size as Jane Austen’s Persuasion, or J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. That’s one module. We must make judicious choices about which modules get localized, and which are the most sought-after languages.

To determine which modules most urgently require translated Help, we’re looking primarily at the number of page views of the cmdlet Help topics in the TechNet Library. Although we don’t yet have the full picture at just five months after General Availability, this is giving us a good idea of which of the new modules are most read by our customers. Here’s a look at the current page view count for the top three non-Core modules, for example:

Module Name Page View Count
Hyper-V 114701
Storage 48653
PrintManagement 23915

We’re also viewing suggestions filed on the Microsoft Connect feedback website for Windows PowerShell. Some of our customers are filing suggestion bugs for getting the Updatable Help translated into languages that they’d like. We welcome and are reviewing these suggestions, too; but again, we will not be able to localize all modules of Updatable Help at this time. Additionally, it’s unlikely that there will be support for languages beyond those in which Windows Server 2012 was shipped. The languages in which the first-localized modules would most likely be available, within three to six months from now, are the following four:

  • Chinese (Traditional)
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese

While other languages might be supported, these are the most likely languages, based on known consumption of Windows Server (and other server and management software from Microsoft, such as the System Center suite, or SQL Server) in non-English languages. We are still open to considering additional language support for Windows PowerShell. Furthermore, we continuously update the localized content, potentially adding new languages, and new topics in previously-available languages.

Please do continue to give us your feedback about languages that you’d like to see, and the updatable Help that’s most valuable to you. And vote with your browsing, by viewing the cmdlet reference topics in your preferred language.

Thanks for your patience, while we work to get our international customers the module Help that they need the most.

The Windows PowerShell Team

Updatable Help speaks only English! What’s up with that?


Our customers have certainly not been shy about their interest in multiple languages of Windows PowerShell Updatable Help, and we’re grateful to hear how much they would value localized Help. Our challenge is this: Updatable Help is a new feature for this release of Windows PowerShell, and we have so very many new cmdlets and modules for Windows PowerShell 3.0 (over 2,300 new cmdlets in 95 modules). It takes time to translate the content once it’s available in English, and we can’t translate all of it. There’s just too much new content. One of the Windows PowerShell Core modules just by itself contains over 87,000 words, meaning it’s roughly the same size as Jane Austen’s Persuasion, or J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. That’s one module. We must make judicious choices about which modules get localized, and which are the most sought-after languages.

To determine which modules most urgently require translated Help, we’re looking primarily at the number of page views of the cmdlet Help topics in the TechNet Library. Although we don’t yet have the full picture at just five months after General Availability, this is giving us a good idea of which of the new modules are most read by our customers. Here’s a look at the current page view count for the top three non-Core modules, for example:

Module Name Page View Count
Hyper-V 114701
Storage 48653
PrintManagement 23915

We’re also viewing suggestions filed on the Microsoft Connect feedback website for Windows PowerShell. Some of our customers are filing suggestion bugs for getting the Updatable Help translated into languages that they’d like. We welcome and are reviewing these suggestions, too; but again, we will not be able to localize all modules of Updatable Help at this time. Additionally, it’s unlikely that there will be support for languages beyond those in which Windows Server 2012 was shipped. The languages in which the first-localized modules would most likely be available, within three to six months from now, are the following four:

  • Chinese (Traditional)
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese

While other languages might be supported, these are the most likely languages, based on known consumption of Windows Server (and other server and management software from Microsoft, such as the System Center suite, or SQL Server) in non-English languages. We are still open to considering additional language support for Windows PowerShell. Furthermore, we continuously update the localized content, potentially adding new languages, and new topics in previously-available languages.

Please do continue to give us your feedback about languages that you’d like to see, and the updatable Help that’s most valuable to you. And vote with your browsing, by viewing the cmdlet reference topics in your preferred language.

Thanks for your patience, while we work to get our international customers the module Help that they need the most.

The Windows PowerShell Team

Hands-on Workshop at the 2013 PowerShell Summit


In my last post I hinted about more news coming soon for the 2013 PowerShell Summit.  In addition to the fantastic list of sessions that attendees will be able to attend, we also have a special event lined up for the last day of the event.  On Wednesday, April 24th, for the entire afternoon attendees will be able to attend a half-day Windows PowerShell scenario walkthrough, presented by the PowerShell Team.

The event will take place on April 24 from 1pm – 5pm.  During this time the PowerShell Team will work with attendees to collectively solve a problem from the ground up using many of the new features in Windows PowerShell 3.0 and Windows Server 2012.

Starting from base Windows Server 2012 images, you will walk through:

  • Writing a PowerShell script workflow to perform Server deployments
  • Creating a constrained endpoint that hosts only the deployment workflow
  • Delegate a set of credentials for the workflow to use
  • Exposing the workflow and it’s results through a RESTful web service
  • Using Windows PowerShell Web Access to manage the workflow

This is a BYOD event, so please don’t forget to bring your own laptop to follow along!

The facilities we have for the conference can only accommodate 50 people at this event.  To give everyone a fair chance to sign up, on December 1st we will send an email from EventBrite to everyone who has already purchased their conference ticket so that they can then sign-up for this free event.  If you want to have a chance to attend this workshop, you will have a much better chance if you buy your ticket before that date!

There will also be other activities that afternoon for those who cannot attend this event due to their travel plans, or if all of the workshop tickets are all gone. If you are able to stick around though and if you can attend this workshop, this should be a fantastic way to end the conference!

Kirk out.

Hands-on Workshop at the 2013 PowerShell Summit


In my last post I hinted about more news coming soon for the 2013 PowerShell Summit.  In addition to the fantastic list of sessions that attendees will be able to attend, we also have a special event lined up for the last day of the event.  On Wednesday, April 24th, for the entire afternoon attendees will be able to attend a half-day Windows PowerShell scenario walkthrough, presented by the PowerShell Team.

The event will take place on April 24 from 1pm – 5pm.  During this time the PowerShell Team will work with attendees to collectively solve a problem from the ground up using many of the new features in Windows PowerShell 3.0 and Windows Server 2012.

Starting from base Windows Server 2012 images, you will walk through:

  • Writing a PowerShell script workflow to perform Server deployments
  • Creating a constrained endpoint that hosts only the deployment workflow
  • Delegate a set of credentials for the workflow to use
  • Exposing the workflow and it’s results through a RESTful web service
  • Using Windows PowerShell Web Access to manage the workflow

This is a BYOD event, so please don’t forget to bring your own laptop to follow along!

The facilities we have for the conference can only accommodate 50 people at this event.  To give everyone a fair chance to sign up, on December 1st we will send an email from EventBrite to everyone who has already purchased their conference ticket so that they can then sign-up for this free event.  If you want to have a chance to attend this workshop, you will have a much better chance if you buy your ticket before that date!

There will also be other activities that afternoon for those who cannot attend this event due to their travel plans, or if all of the workshop tickets are all gone. If you are able to stick around though and if you can attend this workshop, this should be a fantastic way to end the conference!

Kirk out.

Special PowerShell Team Workshop to be Held at PowerShell Summit N.A. 2013


To cap off the 2013 PowerShell Summit the PowerShell Team is going to host a half day Windows PowerShell scenario walkthrough. This is designed to not only familiarize folks with specific PowerShell features, but also to help the team see how you interact with these features.

The event will take place on April 24 from 1pm – 5pm.  During this time we will collectively solve a problem from the ground up using many of the new features in Windows PowerShell 3.0 and Windows Server 2012.

Starting from base Windows Server 2012 images, we will walk you through:

  • Writing a PowerShell script workflow to perform Server deployments
  • Creating a constrained endpoint that hosts only the deployment workflow
  • Delegate a set of credentials for the workflow to use
  • Exposing the workflow and it’s results through a RESTful webservice
  • Using Windows PowerShell Web Access to manage the workflow

This is a BYOD event, so please don’t forget to bring your own laptop to follow along.

We can accomodate 50 people at this event. This will be first-come, first-served registration, open only to paid attendees of the PowerShell Summit N.A. 2013. We will e-mail the invitation code to paid attendees on December 1st (watch your e-mail; it’ll come from EventBrite). Once the 50 slots are filled, the workshop will be closed.

If you’re attending but don’t get a slot in this workshop, or don’t want to attend, then you’ll be able to partake in some lightning-round and ad-hoc sessions in the Summit’s other meeting room.

Windows Management Framework 3.0 Available for Download


We hope that you’ve been enjoying all of the great new Windows PowerShell 3.0 features in Windows Server 2012. We wanted to make sure that everyone knows the final release of Windows Management Framework 3.0 is also available for download from the Microsoft Download Center.

Windows Management Framework 3.0 makes much of the same great management functionality from Windows Server 2012 available to earlier versions of Windows. Windows Management Framework 3.0 allows you to install Windows PowerShell 3.0 (including a new version of WMI and WinRM) on the following Operating Systems:

  • Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (32-bit & 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (64-bit only, includes Server Core) 
  • Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2 (32-bit & 64-bit)

 

Note: You must uninstall any of the pre-release packages of Windows Management Framework prior to installing the final release.

 

Travis Jones [MSFT]
Program Manager – Windows PowerShell
Microsoft Corporation

Windows Management Framework 3.0 Available for Download


We hope that you’ve been enjoying all of the great new Windows PowerShell 3.0 features in Windows Server 2012. We wanted to make sure that everyone knows the final release of Windows Management Framework 3.0 is also available for download from the Microsoft Download Center.

Windows Management Framework 3.0 makes much of the same great management functionality from Windows Server 2012 available to earlier versions of Windows. Windows Management Framework 3.0 allows you to install Windows PowerShell 3.0 (including a new version of WMI and WinRM) on the following Operating Systems:

  • Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (32-bit & 64-bit)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (64-bit only, includes Server Core) 
  • Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2 (32-bit & 64-bit)

 

Note: You must uninstall any of the pre-release packages of Windows Management Framework prior to installing the final release.

 

Travis Jones [MSFT]
Program Manager – Windows PowerShell
Microsoft Corporation

Introducing Management OData Schema Designer


We are excited to introduce the new Management OData Schema Designer tool.

The tool’s goal is to accelerate evaluation /development on top of “Management OData IIS Extension” optional Windows Server 2012 feature. A very informative introduction about this feature can be found in the Standards based management in Windows Server 8 by Jeffrey Snover and Wojtek Kozaczynski.

The new tool has

  • a user friendly schema creation experience (as a wizard)
  • custom Management OData endpoint deployment capabilities.
  • schema editing and validation capabilities

There are 2 versions available:

  • a stand-alone version of the tool: x86/x64 (targeted at ITPros)

PrerequisitesVisual Studio Isolated Shell

  • a Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate/Pro plugin (the same functionality as the stand-alone tool)

 

Please use it and let us know if it is useful to you via the “Issue tracker”.

Raluca Hera

Program Manager, Windows Server Manageability

Microsoft Corporation