The new PowerShell Class is Coming to a CPLS Near You!

Looking for a great getting-started PowerShell class? Or perhaps you'd like to send a colleague or peer to some PowerShell "zero to hero" training?

We've just finished the official beta-teach of Microsoft's 10961, Automating Administration with Windows PowerShell, and it went great. The sequencing of the class was spot-on, and we had an absolutely incredible group of students. Many were n00bs, which was perfect; a couple had "some" shell experience but wanted to learn "the right way." And they did.

Through a series of 12 modules, you're led through the basics all the way up to writing your own script. The grand semi-finale has you creating a script that provisions a brand-new, freshly-installed Server Core instance - all without logging on to that instance at all. The high moment for me was when one student, after struggling a bit to get started on the provisioning lab, concluded with a "well, that did it." Everything came together for him: command discovery, help, scripting, variables, remoting, all of it. He did the task, from scratch, with practically no help. He's there. 

10961 replaces MS course 10325, and it will soon be supplemented by a Microsoft Courseware Marketplace title that goes further into scripting, error handling, debugging, and more... what I've taken to calling toolmaking. We'll hopefully continue to refresh both courses as PowerShell evolves.

So call your local Microsoft Certified Partner - Learning Systems ("training center") and see when they're offering 10961. A bit of caution: this is a class where, unfortunately, an inexperienced MCT will be really challenged. While the course book is a full, almost-500-page book (you're welcome), it's tightly timed and you'll definitely want to check the credentials and experience of whatever trainer is running the class. You can't just "read the slides" to stay a module ahead of the students on this one.

This class is strongly based upon Learn Windows PowerShell 3.0 in a Month of Lunches, in terms of how the material is presented, although the sequence and narrative was altered a bit to better accommodate Microsoft requirements and classroom logistics. I'm really proud of how the course turned out - so if you've got folks who need some PowerShell training, tell 'em to look it up. Many CPLS centers offer remote training, too, meaning you can attend from the comfort of your own home or office.

If you take the class, I'd love to hear what you think.

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About the Author

Don Jones

Don Jones is a Windows PowerShell MVP, author of several Windows PowerShell books (and other IT books), Co-founder and President/CEO of PowerShell.org, PowerShell columnist for Microsoft TechNet Magazine, PowerShell educator, and designer/author of several Windows PowerShell courses (including Microsoft’s). Power to the shell!

4 Comments

  1. Ive been (and still am) an MCT for nearly 20 years. I was looking to run the Powershell month of lunches v3 book as a course as you kindly offer slides and exercises. I was wondering if you have taught the "lunches" course and how long it takes and how it compares to the MOC 10961.

    • When I teach the Lunches course, it's a 3-day - meaning I usually teach a 5-day "master" class that also covers Toolmaking. But I tend to be a very concise, fast trainer. I know Jason Helmick does the regular Lunches class in 5 days at Interface Technical Training. That's about how long the 10961 should take - it's sold as a 5-day class and should take 4.5 to 5 days to deliver.