PowerShell Summit Europe 2014: Prepare for the DSC Hackathon

We're hoping that everyone attending the PowerShell Summit Europe 2014 will join our Monday evening DSC Hackathon, where we'll become "product team members for a night" and try to code up some DSC Resources from the team's own internal wish list!

We'll provide a cash bar as well as finger food for our on-site attendees... but you're welcome to participate remotely, too! Sometime on September 29th, watch PowerShell.org for a posting that includes the challenges. Choose your challenge, and follow the blog post instructions to submit them. We'll also include details for participating live via IRC and other chat mechanisms, and we may be able to do a live room-cast via Lync or something.

There are no winners and no losers - only the entire community wins, because completed entries will be added to the PowerShell.org GitHub repo and made available to the world, for free. But, coders who complete a resource will receive public recognition, both here on PowerShell.org and in some other very visible venues!

Here's what you'll need to participate:

  • A laptop with a charged battery and PowerShell 4.0 installed. We won't be able to provide power, so make sure you can run 1-2 hours unplugged.
  • Ideally, a virtual machine running Win2012R2 that is configured as a domain controller. If your laptop has limited resources, install the full server GUI on that and code right on it - it's the domain controller functionality you'll want.
  • Whatever editing tools you like apart from the ISE.
  • Beforehand, familiarize yourself with "The DSC Book."
  • Have the full DSC Resource Kit installed. In many cases, you'll want to refer to existing resources to see how they do things. At a minimum, the xActiveDirectory module is a good one to have.

Apart from that - stay tuned!

About the Author

Don Jones

Don Jones is a Windows PowerShell MVP, author of several Windows PowerShell books (and other IT books), Co-founder and President/CEO of PowerShell.org, PowerShell columnist for Microsoft TechNet Magazine, PowerShell educator, and designer/author of several Windows PowerShell courses (including Microsoft's). Power to the shell!

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