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Monday Night: PowerScripting Live with Jeffrey Snover & Friends!

The PowerScripting Podcast is pleased to announce:

PowerScripting Live with Jeffrey Snover & Friends!

Date: Monday, Nov 2, 2015

Time: 6 PM - 7 PM PST (1 hour)

Location: the Auditorium at the Hyatt Bellevue in Bellevue, Washington & live streamed at Crowdcast!

Agenda

The PowerScripting Podcast is live from the Auditorium at the Hyatt Bellevue! Join us in person if you are at the MVP Summit; this event is conveniently close to the MVP reception held immediately after. The event is a live Q&A interview with Jeffrey Snover, Technical Fellow & lead architect of Windows Server & System Center. He is joined on stage by PowerShell MVPs Tobias Weltner who will introduce ISESteroids, and Tome Tanasovski who will talk about Flancy--two projects you don't want to miss! Read more

The Monad Manifesto Annotation Project

Richard’s log, stardate 2457164.5

Today's destination is the Monad Manifesto Annotation Project.

The idea behind this project is to keep the manifesto intact somewhere on the internet, and to provide the possibility to the community to annotate on the several topics in the manifesto. The idea for this came from Pluralsight author Tim Warner, with the initial annotations being made by Don Jones. Jeffrey Snover gave his permission for this project, but with a big warning: the content only can be shared on the original source page on penflip, and cannot be hosted anywhere else.

I am already in the progress to put all the chapters from the Manifesto in penflip, and I'm putting the right formatting on it. The idea is to finish this the coming days. After that the actual annotation can be started.

For more information check the project page on penflip:

https://www.penflip.com/powershellorg/monad-manifesto-annotated

Till the next time, live long and prosper.

PowerShell... An exciting frontier...

PowerShell... An exciting frontier...

These are the voyages of a PowerShell adventurer.

Its continuing mission:

To explore strange new cmdlets...

To seek out new modules; new parameters...

To boldly go where no one has gone before!"

Richard's log, stardate 2457163.

Our destination for today is my very first post on PowerShell.org. As you can see, from the opening lines, I approach my journey in PowerShell as a exploration into the unknown, just like the crew of Star Trek, Next Generation did. Till now my journey has been a pleasant one, because you know, exploring PowerShell is a lot of fun! And your exploration should also be a lot of fun, for that reason I want to share with you my discoveries and experiences. These will help you, I hope, to boldly go where no one has gone before!

About Me, And A Statement

My name is Richard Diphoorn, and I’m a IT Professional based in the Netherlands. I work now for around 14 years in IT. My daily work consists mostly of automating, scripting, provisioning new servers, working with System Center, Azure Pack, SMA. Actually everything which can be automated, is that what I am working on. I believe in automation, it’s in my opinion the mindset every IT professional should have.

When I started working in IT, it was not called IT in the Netherlands, it was called ‘automatisering’; in english it’s called ‘automation’. And there you have it, the job I’m doing was always ment to do automation. But still I see a lot of ‘click-next-admins’ around in the field. This term has been thrown up by Jeffrey Snover, and what it means is that there are administrators who click their way trough provisioning and configuration situations, instead of trying to automate this.

It’s my personal quest, to get the intention into the click-next-admins, to learn and use PowerShell. I strive for a transitional change in the admin’s life, by giving them new perspectives on how to ‘do’ things.

For sure I am not the person who possesses all the knowledge, but at least I want to share my passion and the knowledge I build up till now, with the people who are open for it. And with this I invite you, to do together this exploration into ‘strange new cmdlets’. 😉

A Small Introduction

So, with this personal statement I kick off this first post. Our first mission is the exploration of what this thing ‘PowerShell’ actually is, which kind of advantages it brings to you, and why it’s here to stay.

I assume ‘level 200’ as the basic level of my audience, therefore I will not go into the very basics of how you operate a Windows Operating System. I try to avoid unclear technobabble as much as possible, but I don’t want to oversimplify things. I try to make it as simple as possible, but not simpler (where did we heard that before…hmmm…).

Monad, A Brief History Of Time.

If you are like me, you probably bought a little book called ‘Monad’, written by Andy Oakly, quite some years back (if I remember correctly, I bought this book somewhere late december, 2005. I saw this little book on a bookshelf in Waterstone’s, in London. I bought the book because I heard of MSH, and I wanted to learn more about it.

I was hooked. 100%

I still encourage people to read this book, because a lot of information in that book is still relevant, in term of concepts. Topics like the Pipeline, Verb-Noun syntax, cmdlets, repeatability and consistency did not changed from the first version of Monad that the PowerShell team released. This is also the reason why you still see ‘C:\windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0’ on all the Windows OS’es till now. This is because the underlying architecture did not changed. As we will continue to explore, you will see what I mean.

This book will explain to you the very first basic concepts, but for really getting into the dirt, I encourage you to read the Monad Manifesto, written by Monad’s architect, Jeffrey Snover. This manifesto explains the long term vision behind Monad, and describes many elements which are consisting today in PowerShell. This is really a comprehensive document on how Jeffrey first saw the big problems that existed in the way administrators did their work.

He explains the new approaches to different kind of models, and how existing problems be solved with these new approaches. This document will also contributes in your way of thinking the ‘DevOps’ way, because many concepts in here contribute directly to the way you should ‘do’ DevOps. For example, Jeffrey talks about ‘prayer-based parsing’, which is in direct conflict with predictability in certain DevOps scenarios.

Because you need to be able to predict what is happening when you go from Testing to Production. In all cases Deus Ex Machine situations needs to be prevented. You always need to know what is happening and why. In my opinion, DevOps is nothing more than just being really good in automating stuff, PowerShell gives you this possibility.

So, what is PowerShell, and how do I benefit from it?

PowerShell basically is a Shell ( a black box, in which you can type 😛 ), in which you can interact with every aspect of the Operating System in either a interactive or programmable manner.

You type commands in a specific format in this window, and magic happens. This is the simple explanation. Now the rest…

The concept of a shell in which you can manipulate the whole windows system in a interactive way or scripted way, with common syntaxes and semantics, was for me a really powerful and inspiring idea. This new shell helped me working more efficient, effective and with more fun. It enabled me to explore the whole OS, to boldly go where I never have gone before!

This concept is not new for the mainframe operators and the *nix admins; it’s something they are used to already for a long time. If you doubt if working on a command line is a bad thing, go and talk with the *nix admin in your company. They happily will show you how fast they can work, I’m sure!

So for you, as a Windows Administrator, what kind of benefits do you get from learning PowerShell? There are obvious benefits like getting stuff done more quickly, and doing it always in the same way so that you never make that one mistake again. A more un-obvious benefit is that you get to know the OS & Apps very well, because sometimes you really dig into the system, really deep. This level of knowledge can and will benefit you in terms of understanding how a system works, and how to resolve problems. This hugely contributes to your personal success in your career, because you are ‘the topnotch’ engineer. You will be the Geordi La Forge of your company, so to say. 🙂

PowerShell is dead, long live PowerShell!

PowerShell is here to stay, rest assured. Almost all the products made by Microsoft can be manipulated with PowerShell in one way or another. This by providing a direct API to the product itself, or either by providing a REST interface. A lot of products from third-party suppliers also support PowerShell, like VMware, NetApp and Citrix. PowerShell is really getting (or already is) a commodity; actually I advice customers to only buy products which can be manipulated with PowerShell.

Be honest here, if a product cannot be automated, how does this product contributes to the WHOLE business? The business thrives by efficient processes, and if all IT processes are efficient, the business profits hugely from that.

In every company where I have been till now in my IT career, make use of Microsoft software. I believe in the best tools for the job. PowerShell is such a tool. It’s ducttape, wd400 and a swiss knive in one, whatever you want to do, PowerShell can do it (and better).

PowerShell is here to stay my fellow IT pro’s, embrace it fully and enjoy the voyage!

I want to thank the crew at PowerShell.org to give me the opportunity to blog on this site!

Till next time, when we meet again.

Up Next: Jeffrey Snover and John Slack for the WMF5 pre-release party!

avatarEverybody, you will not want to miss what has become a yearly tradition on the show. Tomorrow, Thursday Nov 20th at 9:30 PM EST, we will be welcoming Jeffrey Snover, the inventor of Windows PowerShell, and the architect of Windows Server, back to the show! He will be joined by John Slack, PM on the PowerShell team to discuss the latest news with the upcoming PowerShell version 5 release (also known as WMF5).

As always, the live show will be streamed at live.powerscripting.net, along with a chat room (#powerscriptingpodcast on Freenode IRC) where you can chat with the guests and your fellow scripters!

Tonight on the podcast--Jeffrey Snover!

Hi everyone, it's summer and we are recording on Wednesday. Don't forget to drop by tonight of all nights, because we are pleased to have Jeffrey Snover back again! Topics include JEA, software defined datacenter, DSC for Linux, and anything else that YOU want to talk about!

You can join us live at 9:30 PM at live.powerscripting.net and ask questions of the inventor of PowerShell, and architect of Windows Server and System Center. Don't miss it!

PowerShell Summit N.A. 2014 Session Videos!

Aaron Hoover was kind enough to webcam the Summit sessions he attended, and he's posted the videos on YouTube. URLs, from Aaron's channel, are below.

Just Enough Admin - Security in a Post-Snowden World - Jeffrey Snover - PowerShell Summit 2014

Windows System Internals with PowerShell - Adam Driscoll - PowerShell Summit 2014

PowerCLI: How to Automate Your VMWare Environment Reports - Matt Griffin - PowerShell Summit 2014

Parallel Execution with PowerShell - Tome Tanasovski - PowerShell Summit 2014

PowerShell for Security Incident Response - Lee Holmes and Joe Bialek - PowerShell Summit 2014

Leverage Multi-Threading for Speeding Up Your Scripts - Jason Walker - PowerShell Summit 2014

Advanced PowerShell Eventing Scripting Techniques - Matt Graeber - PowerShell Summit 2014

Using PowerShell as a Reverse Engineering Tool - Matt Graeber - PowerShell Summit 2014

On the Job: Putting PowerShell Scheduled Jobs to Work - Jeff Hicks - PowerShell Summit 2014

The Seven Secrets of CIM - Brian Wilhite - PowerShell Summit 2014

WSMan Cmdlets - Richard Siddaway - PowerShell Summit 2014

Networking Administration with PowerShell - Richard Siddaway - PowerShell Summit 2014

Kerberos Delegation, CredSSP, and Windows PowerShell - Aleksandar Nikolic - PowerShell Summit 2014

The Joy of Intellisense: Tab Expansion - James O'Neill - PowerShell Summit 2014

Trending and Reporting - Don Jones - PowerShell Summit 2014

Leveraging Web Services with PowerShell - Trond Hindenes - PowerShell Summit 2014

Monitoring Using PowerShell - Josh Swenson - PowerShell Summit 2014

Cmdlet-ize the Registry - Richard Siddaway - PowerShell Summit 2014

PowerShell Module Design Rules (and When to Bend Them) - Kirk Freiheit - PowerShell Summit 2014

TechEd N.A. 2014 Session Recordings

There's some great PowerShell content now online for your viewing pleasure.

Jeffrey Snover and I had a blast doing "Windows PowerShell Unplugged," and I reviewed some best PowerShell practices (and hopefully provided a little inspiration for your career) in "Windows PowerShell Best Patterns and Practices: Time to Get Serious." And the #2 overall session of TechEd? "DSC: A Practical Overview," including a surprise demo (and announcement) from Snover showing DSC running on Linux.

Enjoy!

Episode 249 – PowerScripting Podcast – Distinguished Engineer Jeffrey Snover for the PowerShell v4 Launch Party

A Podcast about Windows PowerShell.
Listen:

In This Episode

Tonight on the PowerScripting Podcast, we talk to Jeffrey Snover about PowerShell Version 4

News

Interview

Guests – Jeffrey Snover

Chatroom Buzz-

<0halr9000> ## centralized package management support for v5?

<0halr9000> ## remoting: why not use SSH? (question from a friend of mine)

<12PowerSchill> ## Replacing the ISE with Visual Studio PS

<4Vern_Anderson> ## is there any plan for DSC to replace GPOs?

<4Vern_Anderson> ## is there any plan for DSC to replace GPOs?  << some one said that when Don Jones was on

<11sepeck> ## http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/liveevents/server-virtualization-w-windows-server-hyper-v-system-center-jump-start#?fbid=5qAt-XPCqcE

<11sepeck> ## ^^ 2 day free Server 2012r2 virtualization with cert test voucher event for notes

<0Jaykul> ## @halr9000 hold the mic up for him. :-p

<4Vern_Anderson> ## is there any plan for DSC to replace GPOs?  << some one said that when Don Jones was on

<13deadlydog> ##Jeffrey, do you still have any say on what the PowerShell team works on?

<13deadlydog> ##if not, how does that feel, to hand your “baby” off to others and have no input on what happens to it

<8justpaul> ## what is your religion regarding invoke-expression?

<11sepeck> ## while I realize things are in ‘flux’ at MS for the moment and all this fun ‘cloud’ stuff but right now there are a lot of messages from Microsoft that are less then re-assuring to on site engineers/techs/etc…. i.e. o365 and moving exchange tot he cloud and only just yesterday a note about the next on site release.  Is there an intention to somehow clarify this message for those people ‘not able/willing’ to go to the {azure}clou

<11sepeck> ## a real future for on premisis stuff

<5JHofferle> ## When is Microsoft going to produce some DSC whitepapers? Most of the info I see is coming from the MVPs at this point. If you look at Direct Access or other feature, there are books from MS on how to use it.

<13deadlydog> ## I tweeted this yesterday, but Jeffrey, how do you feel about Centralized Module Management for PowerShell, similar to ruby gems. Do you think it will ever happen?

<8justpaul> ## does Jeffrey know we have to take a shot every time he says “cloud”?

<14gpduck> ## is there any chance additional DSC resources will be released out of band from new versions of windows?

<0Jaykul> ## just saying, for those who don’t know: http://github.com/PoshCode/poshcode

<11sepeck> ## will v4 on windows update blow up Exchange and System Center again and have testing been implemented to avoid this again in the future?

<0organicit> ##for god sake just pay Jaykul to do it

<0halr9000> ## what does SQL product group think of DSC?

<11sepeck> ## isn’t that the purpose of codeplex?  Cause that seems like there is stuff on there now for that very purpose!

<0Jaykul> ## Do you have any influence with CodePlex? Can you make them give us permalinks for downloads?

<0Jaykul> ## is DSC part of CEC now?

<13deadlydog> ## Jeffrey, do you still use PowerShell in your day to day activities, or at all?

<0Jaykul> ## Saw a big partnership with Microsoft and Xamarin recently. Any chance of Microsoft helping PowerShell get cross-platform?

<0Jaykul> ## Even if just the language …

<0Jaykul> ## Are third-party document DSLs possible in PS4? Will there be published (blog posts?) instructions on how to make one?

<5JHofferle> ## What’s the next “Hard Problem” Jeffrey Snover is going to solve?

<0Jaykul> ## Do you know if it’s possible to set the $Options parameter on TabExpansion2 when I press Tab without editing the function by hand? ;)

<13deadlydog> ## Jeffrey, what PowerShell editor do you use? ISE?

<sepeck> http://i.imgur.com/JzX2Xh9.jpg?1

<JonWalz> try this http://vaughnlive.tv/embed/video/jonwalz

<HansO> I only get “Connection failed” at http://vaughnlive.tv/embed/video/jonwalz

<HansO> So I am the only one getting “Connection Failed”  athttp://vaughnlive.tv/embed/video/jonwalz?

<sepeck> http://powerscripting.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/episode-89-powershell-v2-launch-party-with-distinguished-engineer-jeffrey-snover/

<sepeck> http://powerscripting.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/up-next-jeffrey-snover-and-the-powershell-v3-launch-party/

<Jaykul> https://github.com/SublimeText/ElasticTabstops

<sepeck> ## http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/liveevents/server-virtualization-w-windows-server-hyper-v-system-center-jump-start#?fbid=5qAt-XPCqcE

<Jaykul> gpduck: you’ve seen https://github.com/PowerShellOrg/DSC

<sepeck> http://blogs.technet.com/

<sepeck> TechNet Script Center and http://blogs.technet.com/b/onescript/

<Jaykul> ## just saying, for those who don’t know:http://github.com/PoshCode/poshcode

<JimBirley> http://huddledmasses.org/creating-powershell-modules-the-easy-way/

<Jaykul> deadlydog: https://github.com/pash-project/pash

<JimBirley> random, unsolicited beer recommendation =>http://sixpoint.com/beers/seasonal/autumnation

Episode 232 - PowerScripting Podcast - Thomas Kisner on Lync and PowerShell

Listen:

In This Episode

Tonight on the PowerScripting Podcast, we talk to Tom Kisner about Lync!

News

Interview

Guests – Tom Kisner

Links

Chatroom Buzz

  • <ScriptWarrior> Been a WHILE since I was able to make one of these :)  Good to be back.

The Question -

  • Superhero/Power –  Super Strength

Microsoft announces PowerShell v4, DSC

Jun 4, 2013
12

Yesterday at TechEd North America, Jeffrey Snover and Kenneth Hansen began describing features to be delivered with PowerShell v4 in Windows Server 2012 R2 (the company has not yet announced availability dates for either).

In particular, a new feature called Desired State Configuration promises to become the foundation for some pretty serious expansion. Essentially, DSC lets administrators write a declarative "script" that describes what a computer should look like. PowerShell takes that, matches the declarative components with underlying modules, and ensures that the computer does, in fact, look like that. Nearly anything can be checked and controlled: roles, features, files, registry keys - anything, in fact, that a PowerShell module can do.

The architecture includes the notion of centrally stored declarative scripts, and the ability to dynamically deploy supporting modules on an as-needed basis to computers that are checking themselves. A System Center Virtual Machine Manager demonstration utilized the feature to dynamically spin up brand-new VM instances and have them immediately reconfigure to their desired state.

At first glance, it's easy to see "more Microsoft stuff" in this feature. After all, the company has previous given us Dynamic Systems Management (DSM), various universal "configuration languages," and even System Center Configuration Manager's somewhat primitive configuration auditing feature. But keep in mind that DSC will be a core part of the OS. That means product teams and ISVs can rely on it being there, with no other dependencies to worry about. DSC is also built around DMTF standards - like the MOF format - making it natively suitable for cross-platform management. A demo from Opscode using their Chef product showed clever use of the new DSC feature.

Hansen also mentioned that PowerShell modules will be deployable through DSC as ZIP files, helping make them more self-contained (not entirely unlike PECL packages in the Unix world).

There has been no announcement as yet on how far back PowerShell v4 will be made available, nor whether or not DSC is a PowerShell feature or a Windows Server 2012 R2 feature. If it is indeed a PowerShell feature (which I suspect it is), then it'll be available on any system with v4 installed. That will hopefully include at least Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and later.

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